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Past Events

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2019 Summer Lecture Series

with Frank Graziano

The Center welcomes Frank Graziano. He'll present on Historic Churches of New Mexico: A Visual Tour, on Wednesday, August 7th. The year's series theme is Hispanidad!, dovetailing with our newly updated Treasures of the Southwest exhibit featuring items from our Hispanic collections. The lectures take place in the Center's Lyceum Room #120 at 1:30 p.m. Free and open to the public.

In this illustrated talk Frank Graziano provides an overview of historic churches throughout New Mexico and surveys themes pertinent to the churches’ current situation. The talk is based on Frank’s research in villages, Indian pueblos, and archives for his new book, Historic Churches of New Mexico Today.

Frank Graziano’s books on religious cultures include THE MILLENNIAL NEW WORLD (1999), WOUNDS OF LOVE: THE MYSTICAL MARRIAGE OF ST. ROSE OF LIMA (2003), CULTURES OF DEVOTION: FOLK SAINTS OF SPANISH AMERICA (2007), MIRACULOUS IMAGES AND VOTIVE OFFERINGS IN MEXICO (2016), and HISTORIC CHURCHES OF NEW MEXICO TODAY (2019), all published by Oxford University Press.

Graziano is the recipient of grants and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Fulbright and Fulbright-Hays programs, the John Carter Brown Library, Duke University, and the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center, among many others. Between 1999 and 2016 he was John D. MacArthur Professor of Hispanic Studies at Connecticut College.

8/7/2019 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM/Author: Tapley-Booth, Julie/Number of views (372)/Comments (0)/
Categories: EventsPast Events

2019 Summer Lecture Series

with Andy Gulliford

The Summer Lecture Series continues with Andy Gulliford returning to give a talk about, La Estrella del Pastor - Hispano Sheepherders from Colorado and New Mexico: Culture, Tradition, and Sheepscapes, on Wednesday, July 24th. The lectures take place in the Center's Lyceum Room #120 at 1:30 p.m. Free and open to the public.

From his book The Woolly West, Dr. Andrew Gulliford will speak about poor Hispanic sheepherders pastores, and wealthy Hispanic sheepowning families or ricos who transformed the West by the grazing of thousands of sheep across New Mexico and Colorado. He will discuss the history of sheep grazing as well as describe a powerful love story between Aldo Leopold and Estella Luna Otero Bergere. Gulliford will discuss the brutal sheep and cattle wars and explain historical archaeology and the wide variety of sites related to sheep movements, sheep camps, cairns, aspen tree carvings, and lonely sheepherder lifeways in Colorado’s high country for summer grazing. He will show photographs, and discuss cultural traditions, sheep camp recipes, high country wild herbs, and stories of Hispano herders who have grazed and still graze U.S. National Forest and BLM lands. Questions and stories from the audience will be welcomed.

Gulliford received the National Individual Volunteer Award from the U.S. Forest Service. The Woolly West won the Colorado Book Award for History and the Wrangler Western Heritage Award for Outstanding Non-Fiction from the National Cowboy Museum & Heritage Center. Books will be available for sale. Dr. Gulliford is a professor of history and Environmental Studies at Fort Lewis College in Durango.

7/24/2019 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM/Author: Tapley-Booth, Julie/Number of views (332)/Comments (0)/
Categories: EventsPast Events

2019 Summer Lecture Series

with Lois Rudnick

The Summer Lecture Series continues. Lois Rudnick will return to give a talk on, La Fabulosa Fabiola (Cabeza de Baca): First ‘Lady’ of New Mexican Cuisine, on Wednesday, July 10th.
The series' theme Hispanidad! dovetails with our newly updated Treasures of the Southwest exhibit featuring items from our Hispanic collections.

The lectures take place in the Center's Lyceum Room #120 at 1:30 p.m. Free and open to the public.

Fabiola Cabeza de Baca was descended from one of the oldest land grant families in Northeastern New Mexico. Growing up on the “llano,” the vast plains east of Las Vegas New Mexico on her family’s ranch, she demonstrated an impassioned curiosity and intelligence that led her on a path to an extraordinary life devoted to teaching, writing, preserving and celebrating the lifeways of Hispano/a peoples of her land. She published two of the earliest cookbooks about New Mexico cuisine, touting the health of the land-based diet, and is credited with introducing the New Mexico chile into American cooking. She was one of the founders of the Spanish Folklorica Society of Santa Fe, served for many years as a food economist and trainer for the Agriculture Department, during which she travelled hundreds of miles throughout the state visiting small villages and pueblos, and had a weekly bi-lingual program on food and health, on Santa Fe radio.

Lois Rudnick is Professor Emerita of American Studies, University of Massachusetts Boston, where she taught for 36 years and chaired the American Studies Department for 26 years. During her time at UMB, she earned the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching and the National American Studies Association award for outstanding teaching, mentoring, and program development. Rudnick has lectured and published nationally and internationally on Modern American and Southwest American culture and history. Her most recent project was co-curating the travelling exhibition, and co-editing the book, “Mabel Dodge Luhan & Company: American Moderns and the West.”

7/10/2019 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM/Author: Tapley-Booth, Julie/Number of views (329)/Comments (0)/
Categories: EventsPast Events

2019 Summer Lecture Series

with Judith Reynolds

The Center is pleased to continue to offer the very popular Summer Lecture Series, this year based on the theme Hispanidad! dovetailing with our newly updated Treasures of the Southwest exhibit featuring items from our Hispanic collections. Journalist Judith Reynolds will kick off the series with her talk, Fridamania: The Art, Career, and Cultural Legacy of Frida Kahlo, on Wednesday, June 26th. The lecture will take place in the Center's Lyceum Room #120 at 1:30 p.m. Free and open to the public.

Long before there was a Frida Barbie Doll, Frida Kahlo (1907-1954) achieved world fame as an artist, communist, and proto-feminist. Today’s Fridamania has spawned everything from refrigerator magnets, Frida-emojis, children’s books, an opera, and exhibitions brimming with commercial products and artifacts rather than her art.

Reynolds will briefly examine the consequences of Kahlo’s celebrity and focus on her extraordinary pictorial output, a unique, autobiographical record of a woman’s life of aspiration and fortitude.

Judith Reynolds is a journalist, art historian, and political cartoonist. After a career in academia, she switched to the for-profit world of journalism and eventually became arts then managing editor of an upstate New York newspaper. In 1994, Reynolds and her late husband, David, moved to Durango where she began freelancing for the Durango Herald and teaching occasionally at Fort Lewis College.

As a community volunteer, Reynolds launched the FLC Life Long Learning Lecture Series in 2000. Nineteen years later, the free, town-gown series continues and convenes every Thursday evening during the academic year. Next fall, Sept. 5, 2019, Reynolds will inaugurate the LLL series with a talk on the Confederate Statue Controversy titled: “White Guys on Horseback.”

6/26/2019 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM/Author: Tapley-Booth, Julie/Number of views (219)/Comments (0)/
Categories: EventsPast Events

Summer Solstice Window Viewing

Celebrate the dawn of summer!

The Center of Southwest Studies at Fort Lewis College celebrates the Summer Solstice on Friday, June 21, 2019. Doors open at 6:00 a.m. At the dawn of the summer solstice, a spiral of sunlight makes its way across the gallery walls making for a dazzling display. This event is free of charge and is open to the public; light refreshments provided.

Situated in the upper northeast corner of the exhibit gallery, the Solstice Window is recessed into the wall. Created by Denver artist Scott Parsons, as a part of Colorado’s Art in Public Places Program, the window was designed to be integrated with the building’s architecture. Parsons designed the window in tribute to the solstice markers of the Ancestral Puebloans of Southwest Colorado. The spiral cast by the Solstice Window is visible for several weeks before and after the summer solstice, but is sharpest on solstice morning. Moving with the motion of the earth and sun, the spiral makes its journey across the gallery wall, fading as the sun rises higher in the sky.

6/21/2019 6:00 AM/Author: Tapley-Booth, Julie/Number of views (191)/Comments (0)/
Categories: EventsPast Events

RMPBS screening of "Colorado Experience: Ben Nighthorse Campbell"

Q&A with production team to follow with birthday cake for Ben!

Join us Tuesday April 9th at 5:30 pm in the Center's Lyceum Room #120 for a preview screening of the Rocky Mountain PBS "Colorado Experience" episode (26 min) featuring Ben Nighthorse Campbell. Q&A with the production team to follow, and a birthday cake celebration for Ben!

RSVPs can be made here

4/9/2019 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM/Author: Tapley-Booth, Julie/Number of views (664)/Comments (0)/
Categories: EventsPast Events

Examining Violence in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands and its Impact on Nation Building

CSWS Doctoral Fellow Patrick Troester

The 2018-2019 Center of Southwest Studies Doctoral Fellow, Patrick Troester, will present his doctoral research/ thesis on Examining Violence in the U.S. - Mexico Borderlands and its Impact on Nation Building. Patrick is a doctoral student at Southern Methodist University. Join us on Wednesday, November 28th at 5:30 pm in the CSWS Lyceum Room, #120.

11/28/2018 5:30 PM/Author: Tapley-Booth, Julie/Number of views (981)/Comments (0)/
Categories: EventsPast Events

Info Session for Students: Opportunity for Diversity in Conservation (with funding!)

Andrew W. Mellon Opportunity for Diversity in Conservation supports undergrads from STEM/ STEAM fields of study. The weeklong workshop at UCLA/ Getty Museum in summer 2019 introduces students to museum careers in conservation, and could lead to a fully fundednternship at museum conservation labs.

INFO session: Thursday, November 15th from 1:00-2:00 pm in the FLC Student Union Vallecito Room. Light refreshments provided.

11/15/2018 1:00 PM/Author: Tapley-Booth, Julie/Number of views (890)/Comments (0)/
Categories: EventsPast Events
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The Renaissance Palace on Main Avenue

A lecture by Judith Reynolds

The Renaissance Palace on Main Avenue, a look at the four year building boom in Durango between the great fire of 1889 and the depression of 1893, giving the town the Victorian architectural look it has.

Judith Reynolds is an arts journalist, art historian, and political cartoonist. After a career in academia, she switched to the for-profit world of newspaper journalism and eventually became arts, then managing editor of an upstate New York paper. In 1994, Reynolds and her late husband, David, moved to Durango where she began freelancing for the Durango Herald and teaching occasionally at Fort Lewis College. 

10/24/2018 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM/Author: Tapley-Booth, Julie/Number of views (1188)/Comments (0)/
Categories: EventsPast Events
Film screening: "Tribal Radio"

Film screening: "Tribal Radio"

with filmmaker Sean Owen and the KSUT Staffers

The Center of Southwest Studies and KSUT Southern Ute Tribal Radio will host a screening of the short documentary Tribal Radio (24 minutes) on Friday, September 14th at 5:30 pm in the Center’s Lyceum Room #120. A question and answer session with the filmmaker and KSUT staff will immediately follow. This event is free and open to the public.

Film Description

There are over 35 tribal radio stations scattered throughout the United States on Native American reservations that serve their local communities. They provide a source of traditional tribal music, announcements of ceremonies, community news, personal messages, weather warnings, local sports events, and the National Native News program. Often the stations are manned by a few professionals and volunteers operating on a shoe string budget that is dependent on fundraising and grants from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Tribal Radio tells the story of the KSUT radio station that is located on the Southern Ute Indian Tribe’s reservation in Ignacio, Colorado. Through glimpses into the operations of KSUT and its unique connection to the community, tribal activities, and ceremonies, this short film shows the value of tribal radio stations throughout the country.

The Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and in turn tribal radio stations, are often threatened with being defunded. Defunding would cause many Native communities to essentially lose their voices throughout the country. Tribal Radio seeks to show the value of local tribal radio stations and the communities they serve.

Filmmaker Bio

Sean Owen is a native of the San Francisco Bay area, where he studied photography and film at the San Francisco Art Institute. He received a BA at Prescott College in Arizona and a Masters in Clinical Psychology from Antioch College.

After retiring in 2005, Mr. Owen and his wife settled in Durango where he became a full-time filmmaker. Among his eight previous documentaries are Borderlands, a portrait of Cahuilla Indian performance artist Gerald Clarke, and Sing Birds, which opened the Palm Springs Native Film Festival to an overflow audience in 2009 and was nominated for best documentary at the Native American Film Festival in San Francisco. Sing Birds focuses on the ancient tradition known as bird songs, ceremonial and social singing among tribes in California and Arizona. Sing Birds is presently being used in an on-going exhibition about California Indians at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in New York City.

Mr. Owen finished Tribal Radio in 2017 and is now working on a documentary about Ed Si

9/14/2018 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM/Author: Tapley-Booth, Julie/Number of views (1009)/Comments (0)/
Categories: EventsPast Events
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Hours

 Summer Hours - Museum
Monday - Friday: 1 pm - 4 pm or by appointment
Library & Archives: by appointment only 8/12-8/16/19






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